Back To Sweden

Back in Sweden after over two months of traveling, 10,300 km driven, 8 countries visited, and countless memories.  Here are some pictures of the trip home from Greece to Sweden.

Start of The Analysis

Back in Sweden after many weeks of traveling back from Slovenia.  Tomorrow I will start the analysis portion of the data collected. This includes  preparing the dead/living wood samples through sanding and mounting methods, then detailed counting and measuring methods to determine ring size and average growth.  This process requires a microscope and a lot of uninterrupted time. Once both the dead wood and live wood samples have been mounted and counted, the numbers will be entered into a computer program, which Paul has helped create, and analyzed further.  By using the living wood samples as a starting point we will be able to go back in time through many hundreds of years of recorded climate data, the purpose of the dead wood we collected is to allow us to go back even further in time.  For instance if we have a piece of dead wood sampled that died 700 years ago but was 500 years old when it died we will be able to go back in time 1,200 years (with living samples as well) and determine the climate of that area and its changes over time.  This type of analysis is called cross dating and is extremely important and useful in the earth science field.  Because we collected over 70 live samples and 50-60 dead samples there is a lot of work to do before any conclusion climate wise can be made.

Dead wood mounted, 2011 chronology.

Dead wood mounted, 2011 chronology.

Summer School Recap

As I was deleting photos from my camera I found a couple from the summer school itself.  I did not take these photos, seeing as I am a good student and was paying attention, so I asked a professor if he would do the honors.

Here Christina Karamperidou presents on her work which focuses on characterizing ENSO diversity using many methods including mapping climate through dynamic modeling.  This was built off of her previous work which focussed on determining the predictability of the ENSO phenomenon itself.

Here Christina Karamperidou presents on her work which focuses on characterizing ENSO diversity using many methods including mapping climate through dynamic modeling. This was built off of her previous work which focussed on determining the predictability of the ENSO phenomenon itself.

Here Stella Dafka (student) and her group present their findings and predictions for future Mediterranean climate.  This part of the course was unique because students were able to take what they learned over the past 9 days and apply it to their personal research and then present that to the rest of the student body and professors.  Here Stella is focusing her talk on the movement of air masses in the Mediterranean and the expansion of the Hadley Cell and dry zones.  Wet get wetter, dry get drier...

Here Stella Dafka (student) and her group present their findings and predictions for future Mediterranean climate. This part of the course was unique because students were able to take what they learned over the past 9 days and apply it to their personal research and then present that to the rest of the student body and professors. Here Stella is focusing her talk on the movement of air masses in the Mediterranean and the expansion of the Hadley Cell and dry zones. Wet get wetter, dry get drier…

Update

After the summer school in Navarino Greece, Paul and I made our way back up to Italy by ferry, docking once again in Venice.  Because the fieldwork and summer school are now finished, we have a couple weeks holiday before starting the data analysis portion back in Stockholm at the end of July.  Two days ago Paul and I climbed Triglav, the highest mountain in Slovenia reaching 2,864 meters.  It was good to be back in the mountains to say the least.

4am view from Triglav

4am view from Triglav

View from the base of Triglav

View from the base of Triglav

NEO Summer School

For the past 10 days I have attended a summer school which Paul and a few other colleagues organized, aimed at understanding climate change in the Mediterranean region.  Because the course was tailored to phd students much of the material was too detailed and over my head, but I have been able to gain a broader understandings for some of the science and its importance.  About 15 different scientists from all around the world attended and gave two or three lectures detailing either their research or some broader aspect of their specialty.  After everyday it was four different students turn to summarize the lectures in a 30 minute presentation.  My section was on the difficulty with modeling and more specifically modeling the Hadley Cells expansion..needless to say I learned a lot.  At the end of the course the same groups of students presented a little of what they learned from the course and what the future might hold.  This was interesting because it allowed the phd students to talk about their research and how it might relate to the greater scheme of global climate change.  Although, like I said, the class was over my head, I managed to learn a decent amount and make some pretty great contacts with professors and students from around the world.

Students and a couple professors gathered for a picture before dinner at a local taverna.

Students and a couple professors gather for a picture before dinner at a local taverna.